Petitions of the week – SCOTUSblog


Posted Fri, November 15th, 2019 10:00 am by Andrew Hamm

This week we highlight petitions pending before the Supreme Court that address, among other things, whether the government may commence removal proceedings by serving a noncitizen with a “notice to appear” that fails to specify the hearing’s time and place, whether the Fair Credit Reporting Act authorizes consumers to file civil suits against federal governmental agencies under 15 U.S.C. § 1681n and § 1681o, and whether a domestic corporation is subject to liability in a private action under the Alien Tort Statute.

The petitions of the week are below the jump:

Cargill Inc. v. Doe I
19-453
Issues: (1) Whether the presumption against extraterritorial application of the Alien Tort Statute is displaced by allegations that a U.S. company generally conducted oversight of its foreign operations at its headquarters and made operational and financial decisions there, even though the conduct alleged to violate international law occurred in – and the plaintiffs suffered their injuries in – a foreign country; and (2) whether a domestic corporation is subject to liability in a private action under the Alien Tort Statute.

Karingithi v. Barr
19-475
Issues: (1) Whether the government may commence removal proceedings by serving a noncitizen with a “notice to appear” that fails to specify the hearing’s time and place; and (2) whether deference under Auer v. Robbins allows an executive agency to interpret a regulation in a way that conflicts with a congressional statute.

Morgan v. Washington
19-494
Issue: Whether a government official who would like to seize someone’s personal property, and has both probable cause and the time to obtain a warrant, must bring his probable cause to a magistrate to obtain a warrant or may, under the plain-view exception, send a fellow officer to take the property.

Publishers Business Services Inc. v. Federal Trade Commission
19-507
Issues: (1) Whether a district court can award monetary relief under Section 13(b) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, consistent with separation-of-powers principles; and (2) whether a monetary disgorgement award under Section 13(b) of the FTC Act is a penalty and therefore outside a district court’s inherent equity powers.

Robinson v. Department of Education
19-512
Issue: Whether the Fair Credit Reporting Act authorizes consumers to file civil suits against federal governmental agencies under 15 U.S.C. § 1681n and § 1681o.

Posted in Cargill Inc. v. Doe I, Karingithi v. Barr, Morgan v. Washington, Publishers Business Services Inc. v. Federal Trade Commission, Robinson v. Department of Education, Cases in the Pipeline

Recommended Citation:
Andrew Hamm,
Petitions of the week,
SCOTUSblog (Nov. 15, 2019, 10:00 AM),
https://www.scotusblog.com/2019/11/petitions-of-the-week-70/


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